HomeOppression and Human RightsChina: Have Debt? No more Trains or Luxury Hotels

China: Have Debt? No more Trains or Luxury Hotels

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In China, the dream of a better life in the bustling cities quickly turns into a relentless nightmare for millions, especially for individuals like Qin Huangsheng. Once a hopeful young factory worker, Qin now, in her early 40s, faces a staggering $40,000 in personal debt against a meager $400 monthly income. Despite her best efforts, she’s not just struggling to keep up with payments; she’s entangled in a governmental system that restricts her every move. This plight is not unique to her but is a widespread scenario affecting millions in China.

The Chinese government has instituted a punitive approach towards delinquent debtors, going as far as to restrict access to high-speed trains, air travel, and even staying at luxurious hotels. These sanctions come from a government’s blacklist that has swelled nearly 50% since late 2019, now including about 8.3 million names. Such measures underscore a system where falling behind on debts isn’t just a financial struggle but a loss of personal freedoms.

This situation bears a striking resemblance to China’s social credit system, a policy implemented a few years ago that restricted people based on their personal behavior and financial integrity. The system barred millions from traveling, applying penalties for “social misdeeds” ranging from financial delinquencies to minor public disturbances. Like the debt penalties, the social credit system served as a tool for the government to enforce conformity and control under the guise of maintaining public order and trustworthiness.

The mechanics of these systems reveal a broader strategy of the Chinese totalitarian government: control through economic and social penalties. These measures ensure that while the state continues to protect its financial ecosystem and corporate interests, the individual suffers. In stark contrast, Western systems like the United States offer bankruptcy options that can allow individuals a chance to start over, highlighting a fundamental difference in handling personal financial crises that respects individual liberty.

The severe repercussions of unpaid debts in China not only tighten the government’s grip on the populace but also stifle economic freedom and consumer confidence. As households prioritize debt repayment over consumption, this has a knock-on effect on the broader economy, leading to sluggish retail sales and impacting global businesses.

Moreover, the narrative of Qin’s journey from a hopeful teenager to a financially burdened adult reflects a grim reality. Her story sheds light on a society where the cost of financial missteps is not just a personal financial crisis but a comprehensive limitation on personal freedom and dignity.

China is not a place to enjoy freedom, the Communist Party controls every aspect that is important. If you take a risk (the life of every entrepreneur in America…) and go into debt, you are punished. We in America know that risk is an essential part of growth and learning.

https://www.wsj.com/world/china/chinas-punishment-for-people-with-bad-debts-no-fast-trains-or-nice-hotels-bde24da2

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